The Jester of the Roc and the Woman in red

The Jester of the Roc, although they have not been seen in a while, was a creature which had only the purpose of tricking the people of Caspia. It is said they never failed if they tried to trick someone and therefore there are many crazy tales around this mythical Jester.

One of the stories involves a woman in red, on her way to a destination unknown.

“Even though her stride was so fast her red cloak fluttered in the wind, The Jester of the Roc danced their journey beside her with a coy smile underneath their feathered mask.

“Where go you, Woman in red? It must be a nice place, I bet.” The Jester of the Roc asked the question and caught the woman’s glare as she picked up the pace.

She did not answer them for she knew that even though she had to play their game, she hoped she could ignore them until she reached the port and ship nearby. The Jester of the Roc, however, also knew of the port and nearby and knew of her rush.

They had to ask their question to play their fated trick and therefore they ran ahead of the hurrying woman to a tree on the fork in the road. They pushed it over and blocked the shortest path. The Jester of the Roc then stood on the longer road and crossed their arms in wait.

They didn’t have to wait long for the hurrying woman in red and for a second time they asked the question they needed to play the fated trick. “Where go you, Woman in red? It must be a nice place, I bet.”

The woman was distraught to see the shorter fork in the road blocked by a tree the longer road would delay her and it would make her miss her boat. She also refused to submit to the question and with a second glare she said: “Did you truly think a tree would be a problem for a woman like me?”

She lifted her dress and stepped with long strides over the tree, ripping part of the dress into a ribbon which fluttered behind her in the wind. The Jester started after her and she hurried down her path in glee.

Since the woman had thought she had won, she didn’t see the need to run and came to see part of the road to the port to be gone.

The Jester of the Roc had not given up, they had run down the longer road and quickly covered the path in blades of grass and leaves. They stood on the invisible road and crossed their arms in wait. But since the woman was already there, they immediately asked the question they needed to play the fated trick. “Where go you, Woman in red? It must be a nice place, I bet.”

The woman was confused to see part of the road gone but refused to submit to the question and with a third glare, she said: “Did you truly think this trick would make me sway? I’ll go straight ahead until I can see the other part of the way.”And so she did, she hurried along the invisible road with a second minor delay, she eventually could see the port in the distance, just across the way.

The slippery leaves which had been scattered across the path stuck to her shoes but all she had to do was go down a steep hill with thorny bushes beside it and she would make it to her ship in time.

The Jester slowly followed with a little smile. They knew what’d happen and they knew they had a while.

The woman in red, as she ran, slipped on the leaves under her shoes and tumbled next to the path into a thorny bush to which the ribbon of her dress got stuck. She could pull but she would untangle her clothes. The Jester of the Roc approached the woman with a wink. “Where go you, Woman in red? It must be a nice place, I bet.” The Jester then chuckled and with the call of the captain of the ship echoing in the distance, he played his trick to the woman’s sigh. “Either way, to get there you will have to be naked or wet.”

The Jester of the Roc strode to the port and took the boat to the woman’s destination. The woman in red had been tricked into missing her boat because she had been foolish enough to step on the road with too little time.”

***

The moral of this story is: “Hurry when you’ve got time so you’ve time when you have to hurry.”

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